Competitive RECLAIM

Competitive RECLAIM is a performance-driven grant program available to juvenile courts and local communities from the Ohio Department of Youth Services (DYS). It has been made possible by the continued success of juvenile courts in reducing the DYS facility population as well as the successes of the department’s investments in community-based programming to serve the right youth in the right environment with the right treatment.
What is the Purpose of Competitive RECLAIM?
Competitive RECLAIM is designed to divert appropriate youth from further penetration into the juvenile justice system and reduce the need for costly state- and county-supported residential services (DYS facilities, Community Corrections Facilities, and detention facilities) and ineffective and/or costly out-of-home placements (residential treatment in- and out-of-state). The grant program supports juvenile courts and local communities so they can develop services determined by research to be most effective in addressing the assessed needs of multi-system youth and families. In addition, the initiative builds a statistical sample that is analyzed to substantiate the impact of specific interventions and provides outcome data needed to sustain and expand programs that work.
What are the funding and participation requirements?
Requirements for Competitive RECLAIM funding include the following: All program youth must be minimally assessed using the appropriate Ohio Youth Assessment System (OYAS) tool. Courts must adhere to quality assurance standards to ensure program fidelity; quality assurance, including training, coaching, data collection and evaluation at the conclusion of the grant’s final year of funding. These services are contracted by the juvenile court and must be provided by a qualified university partner or vendor. Courts must submit quarterly youth and family tracking data and require that their contracted quality assurance and evaluation partner submit quarterly program and performance measurement data. Residential services are not an allowable activity, though, up to five days of respite services are allowed for courts awarded a regionalization grant. Sex offenders are not an allowed target population for diversion services.
How will we know Competitive RECLAIM works?
DYS, with the assistance of locally contracted third-party quality assurance and evaluation experts, (The University of Cincinnati, Case Western Reserve University, The Strategy Group, Hopewell Health Centers, Rio Grande University & Ohio Northern University) will evaluate each program’s success annually. Long-term outcomes include measuring admissions to DYS and Community Corrections Facilities (CCFs), residential treatment usage, secure detention placements, rates of delinquency and recidivism, and the number of youth diverted to/from the juvenile justice system.
What is the fiscal impact of Competitive RECLAIM?
With $2.2M, awarded each fiscal year, Competitive RECLAIM currently funds 29 programs. The overall fiscal impact of Competitive RECLAIM, as with Targeted RECLAIM, will reduce the need for DYS and CCF beds and county/state funded out-of-home placements.
What happens when a program funded by Competitive RECLAIM is not working?
DYS is committed to working with all juvenile courts and communities to develop programs and services that work. When a program is found to be ineffective, DYS will work with courts and experts to improve services and outcomes. When appropriate, DYS will assist courts in identifying and implementing alternate interventions that may better meet the needs of their youth, families, and community.
Types of Competitive RECLAIM Programs Three distinct categories of funding were made available to the 88 county juvenile courts in State Fiscal Year 2015. The three categories of funding are:
Category One:  Diversion Grants
Fifteen (15) county juvenile courts have been awarded three-year grants for up to $50,000 per year to serve court involved youth eligible for diversion services and assessed as low – moderate risk to reoffend. The overarching purpose for these services are to serve youth and, or families locally with minimal court contact and involvement using evidence-based approaches consistent with risk principle research designed to reduce further juvenile court penetration.

County Program Name Primary Interventions QA & Evaluation Entity
Co-Occurring Disordered Enhanced IHBT IHBT - (ICT Adaptation) Case Western Reserve University
Parent Project Parent Project Curriculum University of Cincinnati -- UCCI
Truancy Erie County Mediation Program Mediation Services & Referral University of Cincinnati -- UCCI
Diversion Accountability Program Probation Diversion Services & BH Referral University of Cincinnati -- UCCI
Truancy Outreach Counseling Program Community Psychiatric Supportive Treatment. (CPST) Case Western Reserve University
Truancy Diversion Adapted Truancy Diversion Curriculum Rio Grande University
Parent Modification Training (PMT) Parent Mgmt. Training Program Case Western Reserve University
JDAI Diversion (Detention & Docket) Intake Diversion Officer - SBIRT and RAI Case Western Reserve University
Exploring he Role of Trauma for Diversion Youth at Risk for Adjudication Structured Sensory Interventions Case Western Reserve University
Diverting Repeat Truancy Offenders Tutoring, Mentoring and Family Asset Building Hopewell Health Centers
The Life Program - BH/JJ Expansion Family Functional Therapy & FFT-CM Case Western Reserve University
1st Time Non-violent Misdemeanor/Status Offender Diversion EPICS University of Cincinnati -- UCCI
Diversion for Unruly Youth I-FAST & Youth/Parenting Classes Center of Innovation & Data Srvs.
EPICS for Influencers Middle & High School Diversion Services University of Cincinnati -- UCCI
Summit County Restore Court 1 TF- CBT / Nurturing Parenting Curriculum & Mentoring Case Western Reserve University
Category Two:  Evidence-Based Program Grants
Twelve (12) county juvenile courts were originally awarded three-year grants for up to $100,000 per year to address the needs of juvenile court and/or any juvenile justice cross-system (BH/JJ, CW/JJ DD/JJ) youth designated as moderate to high-risk to reoffend. One (1) award has since been mutually withdrawn. All awarded programs are evidence-informed or evidence-based and have fundamentally sound QA and measurable outcomes. The overarching purposes of these programs are to serve youth locally with evidenced-informed or evidence-based community programs designed to meet their assessed needs, reduce out of home placement, achieve a reduction in recidivism, and achieve reduced admissions to DYS and/or Community Corrections Facilities (CCF).

County Program Name Primary Interventions QA & Evaluation Entity
Project Change SANKOFA Tanja Nihiser (Consultant )
MDFT Multi-Dimensional Family Treatment Case Western Reserve University
Changing Futures T4C & EPICS University of Cincinnati
Fairfield County Family, Adult & Children First Council High-Fidelity Wraparound & Parent Project University of Washington University of Tennessee
OASIS AIT, TF-CBT & Forward Thinking University of Cincinnati
Juvenile Behavioral Health Court ACRA, MRT and 7 Challenges Ohio Northern University
Functional Family Therapy Functional Family Therapy Case Western Reserve University
Evening Reporting Center - Expansion ART - Skill streaming University of Cincinnati
Summit County Restore Court 2 TF-CBT Case Western Reserve University
Community ART Aggression Replacement Training University of Cincinnati
MST-PSB Multi-systemic Therapy -Problem Sexual Behavior Case Western Reserve University
Category Three:  Community-Based In-Home Treatment Grants
Two (2) five-year Regionalization Grants have been awards of up to $250,000 each year to juvenile courts acting as an administrative agent to a minimum of three surrounding counties to develop and implement in-home evidence-informed services for moderate/high risk to reoffend youth that: (i) is at imminent risk for out of home placement, (ii) has returned from or is transitioning back to their home/ community, or (iii) has significant behavioral health concerns requiring active and intensive crisis stabilization and monitoring.

County Program Name Primary Interventions QA & Evaluation Entity
Southern Ohio Regional
RECLAIM Collaborative
High Fidelity Wraparound and Family Coaching with multi-system youth with an emphasis on JJ youth with educational issues and deficits and mental health needs. Resources include - Solution Focused Brief Therapy, Strengthening Families and Community Reinforcement Approach, Alternative School, MRT, DBT and Trauma Informed Care. Case Western Reserve University
Northeast Ohio Regional
RECLAIM Collaborative
MST and High Fidelity Wraparound with multi-system youth with an emphasis on the JJ /Child Welfare crossover youth population. Case Western Reserve University
FY 2018 Grants
Category One:  Diversion Grants  –  FY 2018
Twelve (12) county juvenile courts have been awarded three-year grants for up to $50,000 per year to serve court involved youth eligible for diversion services and assessed as low – moderate risk to reoffend. The overarching purpose for these services are to serve youth and, or families locally with minimal court contact and involvement using evidence-based approaches consistent with risk principle research designed to reduce further juvenile court penetration.

County Program Name Primary Interventions QA & Evaluation Entity
Juvenile Diversion – Resource Center Motivational Interviewing Case Western Reserve University
Clermont County Evening Reporting Program Coping and Support Training (CAST) Curriculum University of Cincinnati (UCCI)
Diversion Program Diversion & Nurturing Parent Case Western Reserve University
Diversion High Fidelity Wraparound Program Intensive Case Management & High Fidelity Wraparound Case Western Reserve University
Positive Youth Development Positive Youth Justice Model The Ohio State University
I.M.P.A.C.T. Diversion Core Correctional Practices University of Cincinnati (UCCI)
Truancy Diversion Program Motivational Interviewing Case Western Reserve University
Evening Reporting Center II Positive Action Case Western Reserve University
Truancy Mediation Program & Teen Court Restorative Justice Model University of Cincinnati (UCCI)
Juvenile Court Wraparound High Fidelity Wraparound Case Western Reserve University
Paulding County Juvenile Diversion Program Diversion Ohio Northern University
Elementary School Engagement Front End Diversion Initiative Case Western Reserve University
Category Two:  Evidence-Based Program Grants (NEW)  –  FY 2018
Seven (7) county juvenile courts have been awarded three-year grants up to $100,000 per year to address the needs of juvenile court and/or any juvenile justice cross-system (BH/JJ, CW/JJ DD/JJ) youth designated as moderate to high-risk to reoffend. All awarded programs are evidence-informed or evidence-based and have fundamentally sound QA and measurable outcomes. The overarching purposes of these programs are to serve youth locally with evidenced-informed or evidence-based community programs designed to meet their assessed needs, reduce out of home placement, achieve a reduction in recidivism, and achieve reduced admissions to DYS and/or Community Corrections Facilities (CCF).

County Program Name Primary Interventions QA & Evaluation Entity
Cuyahoga Co. Community Based Int. Center Cognitive Behavioral Intervention for Offenders (CBI-CC) Case Western Reserve University
Intensive Family Advocate Program Functional Family Therapy Principles, EPICS, Carey Guides Donna Sigl-Davies
Fairfield County Juvenile Court Mentoring Mentoring The Ohio State University
Greene County Family Engagement Mentor Motivational Interviewing, ART, MRT, Moral Combat Wright State University
Montgomery Co. Community Based Services Thinking for A Change Case Western Reserve University
Morrow County Thinking for A Change Thinking for A Change University of Cincinnati
Union County IHBT Program Intensive Home-Based Treatment (IHBT) Case Western Reserve University
Category Four:  Alternatives to Detention Grants (NEW)  –  FY 2018
Five (5) county juvenile courts have been awarded two-year grants up to $50,000 per year to support court-involved youth designated as low-moderate risk to reoffend that are suitable for a lesser restrictive alternative to secure detention.

County Program Name Primary Interventions QA & Evaluation Entity
Home Detention High Fidelity Wraparound Intensive Case Management & High Fidelity Wraparound Case Western Reserve University
Fairfield Co. Juvenile Court Reporting Center Cognitive & Independent Living Skill Building The Ohio State University
Lucas County Youth Assessment Center Screening, Assessment & Motivational Interviewing Case Western Reserve University
Girls Matter VOICES Curriculum Case Western Reserve University
Detention Alternative Release Program Intermediate GPS & Enhanced Case Management Oriana House, Inc.